The gentle slope in front of the Eisenhower Library off Charles St. commonly referred to as "the Beach."

The gentle slope in front of the Eisenhower Library off Charles St. commonly referred to as "the Beach."

I graduated from the Johns Hopkins University with a BA in Chemistry (conc. Biology).

I came to Hopkins with 76 credits of college credit from high school (google "Texas Academy of Math and Science" if you are wondering how). Finishing my degree in less than 6 semesters meant a blitz of science classes. I generally took multiple laboratory classes at once, and by the end, all of my classes were chemistry and biology.

I hear walking through the campus during the day is very beautiful. I only ever saw it getting to or leaving lab before sunrise or after sunset.

I hear walking through the campus during the day is very beautiful. I only ever saw it getting to or leaving lab before sunrise or after sunset.



 

I got pretty good at NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) spectroscopy. I owe a lot of that to my organic research experience at TAMS (I told you to google it). The trouble with getting good at "shimming" (the goal is to get a lock on a signal) is that everyone asks you to help them do it.

 
This is an IR (infrared) spectrometer. Relatively boring, but a great early step in the characterization process.

This is an IR (infrared) spectrometer. Relatively boring, but a great early step in the characterization process.

NMRs are my friends.

NMRs are my friends.

This is a GC-MS (gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer). This thing is awesome. Kind of like magic if you've ever run columns and subsequent batteries of NMRs just to characterie

This is a GC-MS (gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer). This thing is awesome. Kind of like magic if you've ever run columns and subsequent batteries of NMRs just to characterie

While I loved chemistry (particularly organic chemistry) at TAMS and early on at Hopkins, my interests floated more toward biology as time went on.

The faculty in the Biology department at Johns Hopkins is quite simply stunning. While many are Nobel laureates or otherwise conducting Nobel-caliber research, there is an undeniable teaching culture in the classes. Professors treat classes as more than a job to support their research. 

I credit these amazing mentors with my understanding of biochemistry, cell biology, and genetics.

 

Shriver Hall at the end of the quad.

Shriver Hall at the end of the quad.